On collaboration and criticism [by Dan] by Rachel Briscoe

I’ve increasingly come to believe that the cult of the individual isn’t a very accurate or helpful way of looking at the world. By the cult of the individual, I mean the pervasive idea of the individual genius artist, but also the pressure people in the arts sometimes face to talk about themselves as an individual rather than part of a collective. 

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On hospitality by Rachel Briscoe

We’ve just come to the end of the first phase of making a show for a blindfolded audience. We realised that very early in the piece we would need to do something which would say clearly to the audience, ‘we are here to care for you, not to freak you out.’ The shorthand we used for this was ‘the hospitality moment’. I recently read that the word hospitality is related to the word hostility. The root hospes is allied to the root hostis, which means both ‘stranger’ and ‘enemy’. So hospitality, as in hostilis (stranger/ enemy) + potes (having power), originally meant the power that the host has over the stranger/ enemy. Which is pretty pertinent to theatre, when you think about it, especially if you’re thinking about audience members who might not have come before.

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In search of the pause... by Rachel Briscoe

Dating apps. Everyone involved is looking for love/ sex/ a partner. While some sites have algorithms that use sets of questions to determine a match % with potential partners, on others your starting point is a picture. From this picture you progress to text-conversation. When you’re talking to someone face to face, you’re getting three types of information from them - the words they are saying, the tone of their voice and any facial or bodily expressions they make. In computer-mediated communication, these second two are stripped out: all you have is the words...

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do we really mean dialogue? by Rachel Briscoe

Following Brexit and also the hideous election of Trump, a lot of liberal folk have identified the need to get out of the echo chamber, or the bubble, and find a way of talking to people who hold differing views to them. Underlying this, though, I sometimes sense a mission. Why sit down with these people? Because you want to understand them, or because, secretly, you think that if you could just talk to these people, tell them what you know, what you read, they’d come round to your way of thinking?

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Group thinkings by Rachel Briscoe

Homophily is the principle that contact between similar people occurs at a higher rate than among dissimilar people. This is kind of something we all know: birds of a feather flock together. Overwhelming evidence shows that we’re more likely to form ties with people like ourselves, and that ties with people unlike ourselves dissolve more easily: this is problematic in lots of ways...

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